Cops hunt News Corp ‘genius’

INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM:

Australian law enforcement agencies including all state and territory police forces and the Australian Federal Police are vying with overseas crime-fighting organisations such as the FBI, Scotland Yard, and Interpol to recruit News Corp Australia reporter James Morrow. (main picture)

All major crime-busting agencies around the world are believed to also be engaged in a fierce battle to sign up Mr Morrow following publication this week of his ground-breaking analysis of efforts by some Australians to have a judicial inquiry established into historical rape allegations against federal Attorney-General Christian Porter by an Adelaide woman now deceased.

“It’s the type and depth of analysis that Mr Morrow has displayed that we seek and foster in our own organisation,” FBI director Christopher Wray told The Bug from Washington DC.

Mr Morrow’s detailed analysis appeared in News Corp Australia’s Sydney turdbloid the Daily Telegraph on Friday. (pictured)

In it he uncovered a conspiracy-like “web” of connections between some of the public figures calling for an inquiry while also presenting hard evidence of their “left wing” biases.

For example, Mr Morrow’s analysis showed a definitive link between former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull, ABC reporter Louise Milligan, and Jo Dyer who was a friend of the deceased woman. All three have sought an inquiry.

Mr Morrow discovered that Ms Dyer was director of the Adelaide Writers’ Festival and that Mr Turnbull had appeared at the festival in an undisclosed year, while Ms Milligan was inextricably linked to Mr Turnbull because she had appeared with him at the festival.

Secretary-general of Interpol, Jurgen Stock, said he was impressed by Mr Morrow’s ability to bring together disparate pieces of evidence to mount a watertight case against offenders.

“This type of genius is seen only very rarely in the world of crime fighting. That’s why I’d love to have Mr Morrow come and work for us,” Mr Stock said from his office in the French city of Lyon.

Mr Morrow’s landmark analysis drew other unarguable links between people in what he described as a “high-profile group of media figures, politicians, and cultural identities, many with strong links to Labor and left-wing politics”.

In another example of Mr Morrow’s unique investigative skills he revealed that the “web” of left-wing advocates of an inquiry into the Porter matter included federal Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese and prominent federal Labor figure Tanya Plibersek.

Mr Morrow’s article uncovered the fact that Mr Albanese and Ms Plibersek were “opposition colleagues”.

His investigation also laid out evidence supporting claims – largely levelled by Mr Morrow – that the deceased woman’s lawyer Michael Bradley was a left-winger and critic of the Morrison Government.

His evidence, so far unrefuted by Mr Bradley, was that the lawyer had advocated for his deceased client, was a managing partner of a “boutique” law firm, and had called on Mr Porter to step down.

Head of the UK’s legendary crime-fighting force Scotland Yard, formally known as the Metropolitan Police Service, Commissioner Cressida Dick, was obviously impressed by Mr Morrow’s work.

“I can honestly say I have never seen anything like it,” she said in reference to his article when contacted by The Bug.