Morrison surges in latest poll

FEDERAL POLITICS:

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has surged in popularity in the latest poll, suggesting he has well and truly put his national bushfire missteps and grants rorts sagas behind him.

The poll, commissioned exclusively by The Bug, suggests a strong performance from now on by the PM on how he handles the Coronavirus scare and rebuilds the national economy will see him in the box seat for victory at the 2022 poll.

At complete odds with mainstream polls such as the last three Newspolls that have had Morrison in minus-20 or more on approval, The Bug poll shows the PM’s approval rating has roared back into positive territory, with 100 per cent approval and 0 per cent disapproval.

Call The Bug old-fashioned if you must, but the poll was conducted in the time-honoured tradition of telephone landlines, and typical of the respondents was a Laura Tingle of Sydney.

“Unbelievable. Just before you rang I was thinking how pollsters are all telling us that the Australian public is sick and tired of the sports rorts saga and other so-called grants scandals.,” Ms Tingle said.

“Surely it’s time to move on? I think that understandable apathy will work in the Morrison’s government’s favour.”

Another respondent shared Ms Tingle’s views.

Fran Kelly, also of Sydney, told The Bug‘s pollster: “I couldn’t agree more with Laura. Surely as a country it’s time to move on. Nothing new has come out about the sports grants kerfuffle for weeks now and I suspect the public is bored by it, to be fran. Our nation is facing serious challenges and it’s time to give Prime Minister Scott Morrison a chance to show the leadership that I believe the Australian people know he’s capable of.”

Another respondent shared Fran Kelly’s views.

Paul Kelly, also of Sydney, told The Bug‘s pollster: “I couldn’t agree more with Fran. Given some clean air from now on, I think Scott Morrison could be our greatest prime minister since Sir Robert Menzies.”

The Bug’s poll had three respondents and has a margin or error of 12,321 per cent or perhaps even a bit higher.